Presentation Title

The Parental Experience of Having a Child Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

Abstract

Currently, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic illness diagnosed in children. The long-term implications for the child are numerous, and a diagnosis involves many medical decisions and technical management procedures that requires a caregiver to assume the bulk of the responsibility. By focusing on parents and guardians of children with T1DM who live in Vermont and their personal experiences, this research continues to further the understanding of this overlooked population and can be used to reinforce and validate previous findings. This is a qualitative study in which virtual interviews with 12 participants was conducted, and they were asked questions pertaining to their lived experience following the diagnosis of their child with T1DM. The results revealed that caregivers are greatly affected and experience a variety of intense emotional responses along the continuum of grief, or the common stages of grief. This is important for providers to know and understand in order to best support parents, who are largely responsible for the labor-intensive self-management needed in a pediatric diagnosis. Future research could focus on identifying and implementing specific ways in which to adequately support this population.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Sarah Narkewicz

Secondary Mentor Name

Susan Kasser

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Second Student College

Honors College

Program/Major

Nursing

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Parental Experience of Having a Child Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

Currently, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic illness diagnosed in children. The long-term implications for the child are numerous, and a diagnosis involves many medical decisions and technical management procedures that requires a caregiver to assume the bulk of the responsibility. By focusing on parents and guardians of children with T1DM who live in Vermont and their personal experiences, this research continues to further the understanding of this overlooked population and can be used to reinforce and validate previous findings. This is a qualitative study in which virtual interviews with 12 participants was conducted, and they were asked questions pertaining to their lived experience following the diagnosis of their child with T1DM. The results revealed that caregivers are greatly affected and experience a variety of intense emotional responses along the continuum of grief, or the common stages of grief. This is important for providers to know and understand in order to best support parents, who are largely responsible for the labor-intensive self-management needed in a pediatric diagnosis. Future research could focus on identifying and implementing specific ways in which to adequately support this population.