Presentation Title

PTOA Risk Following ACL, Meniscal, or ACL and Meniscal Injury

Project Collaborators

Mathew Failla (Doctoral Research Mentor)

Abstract

Background: This study will investigate the risk of PTOA following ACL injury, meniscal injury, or combined ACL and meniscal injury in young active individuals.

Methods: Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro were used to search keywords pertinent to ACL, meniscus, and osteoarthritis of the knee. To be considered for inclusion the study must have been a RCT or prospective cohort study, utilized KL grade to diagnose OA, evaluated patient 10+ years following injury/surgery, and only included athletes aged 14-25. Studies were placed through Web of Science to identify potentially omitted/overlooked studies. Potential risk of bias was minimized using independent screening protocol. CEBM was used to appraise the level of evidence.

Results: 7 studies – totaling 806 participants were available for full data extraction. The prevalence of PTOA ranged from 35-71% 10-15 years following an isolated ACLR with an odds ratio of 1.7. The prevalence of PTOA ranged from 46-79% 12-15 years following an isolated ACLR with meniscus injury with an odds ratio of 3.6.

Conclusion: Both isolated ACLR and ACLR with meniscus injury result in a significantly greater likelihood of PTOA development, with the latter showing the greatest risk. Clinicians will use this information to educate their patients throughout the rehabilitation course, advocate for research in preventative measures, and develop short term and long-term rehabilitation programs.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Mathew Failla

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Physical Therapy

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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PTOA Risk Following ACL, Meniscal, or ACL and Meniscal Injury

Background: This study will investigate the risk of PTOA following ACL injury, meniscal injury, or combined ACL and meniscal injury in young active individuals.

Methods: Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro were used to search keywords pertinent to ACL, meniscus, and osteoarthritis of the knee. To be considered for inclusion the study must have been a RCT or prospective cohort study, utilized KL grade to diagnose OA, evaluated patient 10+ years following injury/surgery, and only included athletes aged 14-25. Studies were placed through Web of Science to identify potentially omitted/overlooked studies. Potential risk of bias was minimized using independent screening protocol. CEBM was used to appraise the level of evidence.

Results: 7 studies – totaling 806 participants were available for full data extraction. The prevalence of PTOA ranged from 35-71% 10-15 years following an isolated ACLR with an odds ratio of 1.7. The prevalence of PTOA ranged from 46-79% 12-15 years following an isolated ACLR with meniscus injury with an odds ratio of 3.6.

Conclusion: Both isolated ACLR and ACLR with meniscus injury result in a significantly greater likelihood of PTOA development, with the latter showing the greatest risk. Clinicians will use this information to educate their patients throughout the rehabilitation course, advocate for research in preventative measures, and develop short term and long-term rehabilitation programs.