Presentation Title

Efficacy of Scapular Focused Treatment for Shoulder Pain

Project Collaborators

Mathew Failla (Faculty mentor)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of scapular focused treatment interventions on shoulder pain and biomechanics in patients with non-specific shoulder pain.

Design: Systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials.

Methods: The literature search was conducted in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro and Cochrane Library up to July 2020. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and a quasi-experimental design were included; appraised using the Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) levels of evidence.

Results: Ten studies were included (n = 375) describing scapular-based interventions that targeted shoulder pain and assessed changes in shoulder biomechanics. Six studies captured biomechanical measurements and nine studies reported on pain. Two studies showed a statistically significant improvement with upward rotation, three for external rotation, and zero for flexion. Three studies showed a statistically significant reduction in pain.

Conclusion: Although scapular based exercise interventions demonstrate a positive impact on pain and perceived disability in patients with shoulder pain, results were inconsistent regarding biomechanical changes and greater improvements were seen when the interventions were combined with a generalized program focused on strength and range of motion (ROM). More high-quality research is needed to understand the effects of these interventions in clinical practice.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Mathew Failla, PT, Ph.D., SCS

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Physical Therapy

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Efficacy of Scapular Focused Treatment for Shoulder Pain

Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of scapular focused treatment interventions on shoulder pain and biomechanics in patients with non-specific shoulder pain.

Design: Systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials.

Methods: The literature search was conducted in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro and Cochrane Library up to July 2020. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and a quasi-experimental design were included; appraised using the Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) levels of evidence.

Results: Ten studies were included (n = 375) describing scapular-based interventions that targeted shoulder pain and assessed changes in shoulder biomechanics. Six studies captured biomechanical measurements and nine studies reported on pain. Two studies showed a statistically significant improvement with upward rotation, three for external rotation, and zero for flexion. Three studies showed a statistically significant reduction in pain.

Conclusion: Although scapular based exercise interventions demonstrate a positive impact on pain and perceived disability in patients with shoulder pain, results were inconsistent regarding biomechanical changes and greater improvements were seen when the interventions were combined with a generalized program focused on strength and range of motion (ROM). More high-quality research is needed to understand the effects of these interventions in clinical practice.