Examining the Effect Meniscus Pathology and Time from Surgery have on Knee Strength and Biomechanical Function in Post-ACLR Patients

Abstract

Damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be debilitating, especially to athletes, and can lead to the need for extensive repair and rehabilitation. Many patients of ACLR are being cleared for return to sport despite lingering limb asymmetry. This asymmetry has been linked to increased risk of re-injury and highlights a need for RTS timelines to be better shaped to meet the needs of athletes. Through data analysis of single-legged triple hop tests on patients post-ACLR, asymmetry will be measured and compared to biomechanical function, status of the meniscus, and sex of the subject.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Bruce Beynnon

Secondary Mentor Name

Susan Kasser

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Health Sciences

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Abstract only.

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Examining the Effect Meniscus Pathology and Time from Surgery have on Knee Strength and Biomechanical Function in Post-ACLR Patients

Damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be debilitating, especially to athletes, and can lead to the need for extensive repair and rehabilitation. Many patients of ACLR are being cleared for return to sport despite lingering limb asymmetry. This asymmetry has been linked to increased risk of re-injury and highlights a need for RTS timelines to be better shaped to meet the needs of athletes. Through data analysis of single-legged triple hop tests on patients post-ACLR, asymmetry will be measured and compared to biomechanical function, status of the meniscus, and sex of the subject.