Regional Differences in Food-Based Social Cohesion During the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a substantial increase in mental and physical health issues, food security, unemployment, and housing stability in all areas across the country. This research will explore if there is a correlation between the level of perceived social cohesion in a community during COVID-19 and the level of food insecurity in New Mexico, Illinois and Vermont. This research will compare data from all three states and focus on BIPOC households. This thesis uses data from a survey sent out by a research team called the National Food Access and COVID research Team (NFACT).

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Farryl Bertmann

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Nutrition and Food Sciences

Second Program/Major

Public Communication

Primary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

Secondary Research Category

Social Sciences

Abstract only.

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Regional Differences in Food-Based Social Cohesion During the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a substantial increase in mental and physical health issues, food security, unemployment, and housing stability in all areas across the country. This research will explore if there is a correlation between the level of perceived social cohesion in a community during COVID-19 and the level of food insecurity in New Mexico, Illinois and Vermont. This research will compare data from all three states and focus on BIPOC households. This thesis uses data from a survey sent out by a research team called the National Food Access and COVID research Team (NFACT).