Evaluating Aeroponic Cloners as a Sustainable Propagation System

Presenter's Name(s)

Trevor Jens JozefowiczFollow

Abstract

As traditional growing media, such as perlite and vermiculite, are becoming a limited resource and more difficult to obtain, options for more sustainable alternatives are being sought. This project looks to test the root production on cuttings of two woody plants (boxwood and holly) when propagated using a small scale aeroponic cloner versus in a traditional perlite and vermiculite medium. If the cloners prove to be as effective as traditional media, they could become a keystone of UVM greenhouse sustainability, and be utilized by PSS faculty and students by working with equipment that is at the forefront of the industry.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Mark Starrett

Student Collaborators

Connor Kepcher

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Food Systems

Primary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

Secondary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Abstract only.

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Evaluating Aeroponic Cloners as a Sustainable Propagation System

As traditional growing media, such as perlite and vermiculite, are becoming a limited resource and more difficult to obtain, options for more sustainable alternatives are being sought. This project looks to test the root production on cuttings of two woody plants (boxwood and holly) when propagated using a small scale aeroponic cloner versus in a traditional perlite and vermiculite medium. If the cloners prove to be as effective as traditional media, they could become a keystone of UVM greenhouse sustainability, and be utilized by PSS faculty and students by working with equipment that is at the forefront of the industry.