Non-market food and agricultural practice in Vermont’s Back-to-the-Land generation

Presenter's Name(s)

Miles McCallumFollow

Abstract

The Back-to-the-Land movement of the 1960’s and 70’s saw a migration to Vermont of politically engaged, agrarian minded, and socially liberal “Freaks, Radicals, and Hippies” (to borrow language from a 2016 Vermont Historical Society exhibit). The cultural and political legacy of this generation still drives much of the identity and shape of Vermont. Of particular interest in looking at the unique legacy of this generation is their relationship with food and agriculture. This research surveys the history, political dynamics, and agricultural legacy of the Back-to-the-Land generation in Vermont.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Josh Farley

Graduate Student Mentors

Sam Bliss

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Second Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Community and International Development

Second Program/Major

Global Studies

Primary Research Category

Vermont Studies

Secondary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

Tertiary Research Category

Social Sciences

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Non-market food and agricultural practice in Vermont’s Back-to-the-Land generation

The Back-to-the-Land movement of the 1960’s and 70’s saw a migration to Vermont of politically engaged, agrarian minded, and socially liberal “Freaks, Radicals, and Hippies” (to borrow language from a 2016 Vermont Historical Society exhibit). The cultural and political legacy of this generation still drives much of the identity and shape of Vermont. Of particular interest in looking at the unique legacy of this generation is their relationship with food and agriculture. This research surveys the history, political dynamics, and agricultural legacy of the Back-to-the-Land generation in Vermont.