Attribution as a Moderator between Extreme Weather Events and Pro-Environmental Behavior

Presenter's Name(s)

Chris Donovan

Abstract

Human actions are responsible for the warming of the planet and its consequences, including an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events. Experience with extreme events has potential to change behavior, but outcomes could depend on the nature of the experience and whether the events are attributed to climate change. We will use a structural equation model to explore how attribution moderates the effect that extreme weather events have on pro-environmental behaviors, measured using the Repeated Environmental Behavior Latent (REBL) Scale. Understanding this pathway could help inform behavioral interventions to mitigate climate change

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Trisha Shrum

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Community Development and Applied Economics

Primary Research Category

Social Science

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Attribution as a Moderator between Extreme Weather Events and Pro-Environmental Behavior

Human actions are responsible for the warming of the planet and its consequences, including an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events. Experience with extreme events has potential to change behavior, but outcomes could depend on the nature of the experience and whether the events are attributed to climate change. We will use a structural equation model to explore how attribution moderates the effect that extreme weather events have on pro-environmental behaviors, measured using the Repeated Environmental Behavior Latent (REBL) Scale. Understanding this pathway could help inform behavioral interventions to mitigate climate change