Presentation Title

Parameterizing Functions of Soil-Water Soluble Reactive Phosphorus Flux for an Ecohydrological Model of Formerly Drained Riparian Wetlands in the Lake Champlain Basin

Presenter's Name(s)

adrian r.h. wiegmanFollow

Project Collaborators

Eric Roy (Graduate Advisor), Breck Bowden (Graduate Committee Member), Kristen Underwood (Collaborating Mentor), Isabelle Augustine (Technician), Marcos Kubow (Technician), Harrison Meyers (Technician)

Abstract

Elevated phosphorus (P) concentrations in numerous freshwater lakes in North America are leading to a higher frequency of potentially harmful cyanobacteria blooms. Lake Champlain is an example and in 2016 the U.S. EPA passed a stringent P total maximum daily load limit for the Vermont tributaries to the lake. Wetland restoration may help reduce P loading by increasing water and sediment retention and over 4000 potential wetland restoration sites have been identified in Vermont. Most candidate sites overlay historically drained agricultural fields with potentially high existing amounts of legacy soil P. The fate and transport of this legacy soil P will be affected by hydrologic modifications. We are developing a wetland biogeochemical process model to be used in conjunction with hydraulic models (e.g., HEC-RAS) to estimate the effect of restoration activity on floodplain P balance. This poster focuses on the development of functions that relate soil properties of Vermont wetlands to P sorption dynamics and soluble reactive P (SRP) diffusion rates across the soil-water interface. As expected, results from spring flood monitoring and lab simulated floods indicate that soil-to-water SRP flux is greater under lower floodwater oxygen conditions and negatively correlated with time since farming. Future research will whether simple soil tests (e.g., water extractable P) and/or widely collected state soil test data (e.g., Modified Morgan extractable P, Al, Fe used in the Northeast) could be used to estimate flux parameters in process models that simulate the effects of wetland restoration on P dynamics.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Eric Roy

Status

Graduate

Student College

Rubenstein School of Environmental and Natural Resources

Program/Major

Natural Resources

Primary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Parameterizing Functions of Soil-Water Soluble Reactive Phosphorus Flux for an Ecohydrological Model of Formerly Drained Riparian Wetlands in the Lake Champlain Basin

Elevated phosphorus (P) concentrations in numerous freshwater lakes in North America are leading to a higher frequency of potentially harmful cyanobacteria blooms. Lake Champlain is an example and in 2016 the U.S. EPA passed a stringent P total maximum daily load limit for the Vermont tributaries to the lake. Wetland restoration may help reduce P loading by increasing water and sediment retention and over 4000 potential wetland restoration sites have been identified in Vermont. Most candidate sites overlay historically drained agricultural fields with potentially high existing amounts of legacy soil P. The fate and transport of this legacy soil P will be affected by hydrologic modifications. We are developing a wetland biogeochemical process model to be used in conjunction with hydraulic models (e.g., HEC-RAS) to estimate the effect of restoration activity on floodplain P balance. This poster focuses on the development of functions that relate soil properties of Vermont wetlands to P sorption dynamics and soluble reactive P (SRP) diffusion rates across the soil-water interface. As expected, results from spring flood monitoring and lab simulated floods indicate that soil-to-water SRP flux is greater under lower floodwater oxygen conditions and negatively correlated with time since farming. Future research will whether simple soil tests (e.g., water extractable P) and/or widely collected state soil test data (e.g., Modified Morgan extractable P, Al, Fe used in the Northeast) could be used to estimate flux parameters in process models that simulate the effects of wetland restoration on P dynamics.