Presentation Title

Dolphin Whistle Geographical Variation in Central America

Abstract

The pantropical spotted dolphin is the most abundant dolphin species in the Pacific coast of Central America. Like other dolphin species, they rely on sound to communicate, primarily through the use of narrow banded frequency modulate sounds called whistles. Here we study their whistle acoustic structure variation across populations in Mexico, Panama and Costa Rica. Data collected from autonomous underwater recorders was processed to extract standard frequency variables (e.g., high frequency, low frequency, delta frequency, peak frequency), duration, the number of harmonics, and modulation (e.g., inflection points, contour). The study of whistle acoustic structure can contribute to our understanding of population structure and inform government and non-profit organizations to better manage and regulate these populations.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Laura May-Collado

Secondary Mentor NetID

bballif

Secondary Mentor Name

Bryan Ballif

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Neuroscience

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Second College (optional)

College of Arts and Sciences

Second Program/Major

Biological Science

Secondary Research Category

Biological Sciences

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Dolphin Whistle Geographical Variation in Central America

The pantropical spotted dolphin is the most abundant dolphin species in the Pacific coast of Central America. Like other dolphin species, they rely on sound to communicate, primarily through the use of narrow banded frequency modulate sounds called whistles. Here we study their whistle acoustic structure variation across populations in Mexico, Panama and Costa Rica. Data collected from autonomous underwater recorders was processed to extract standard frequency variables (e.g., high frequency, low frequency, delta frequency, peak frequency), duration, the number of harmonics, and modulation (e.g., inflection points, contour). The study of whistle acoustic structure can contribute to our understanding of population structure and inform government and non-profit organizations to better manage and regulate these populations.