Presentation Title

Effects of Love on External Anxiety

Project Collaborators

Lilian Dalton ( Graduate Student Mentor)

Abstract

Previous studies that have examined the association between love and anxiety have revealed that young adults in romantic relationships may be more prone to anxiety and depression (Brand, 2015). However, the effect that being in love may have on external anxiety that does not directly involve the relationship has been given little attention (Gawda, 2012). This study observes how those who are in love react to anxiety primed music in a laboratory setting. Seventy female participants between the ages of 18-24 were split into two groups, those who were in love and those who were not. The study assessed their level of love and anxiety through self-report questionnaires. Anxiety was primed by listening to high-tempo music identified as anxiety-provoking by a team of coders. Also, participants were instructed to write down an anxiety-provoking experience while listening to music. Participant responses were assessed by a self-report evaluation of mood, emotions, and physical state. We hypothesize that those who were in love will have lower anxious responses to music primes than those who were not in love.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Alessandra Rellini

Graduate Student Mentors

Lilian Dalton

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Psychological Science

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

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Effects of Love on External Anxiety

Previous studies that have examined the association between love and anxiety have revealed that young adults in romantic relationships may be more prone to anxiety and depression (Brand, 2015). However, the effect that being in love may have on external anxiety that does not directly involve the relationship has been given little attention (Gawda, 2012). This study observes how those who are in love react to anxiety primed music in a laboratory setting. Seventy female participants between the ages of 18-24 were split into two groups, those who were in love and those who were not. The study assessed their level of love and anxiety through self-report questionnaires. Anxiety was primed by listening to high-tempo music identified as anxiety-provoking by a team of coders. Also, participants were instructed to write down an anxiety-provoking experience while listening to music. Participant responses were assessed by a self-report evaluation of mood, emotions, and physical state. We hypothesize that those who were in love will have lower anxious responses to music primes than those who were not in love.