Presentation Title

Neurophysiological and Behavioral Correlates of Post-Concussion Syndrome: A scoping review and validation of methods

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is caused by an impact or jolt to the head which results in a physiological disruption to the brain. While typically symptoms such as headache, nausea, dizziness and fatigue subside within the first 10 days, a subset of patients fail to recover within this time span and develop prolonged neurophysiological and behavioral symptoms characteristic of post-concussion syndrome (PCS). There is an extensive body of research investigating the various cognitive, physical, emotional, and neurological deficits correlated with PCS. Previous research is yet to depict a complete understanding of the prolonged structural and functional changes that occur within the brain as a result of mTBI. While there are numerous studies assessing the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of PCS, with my knowledge, there remains a need for these papers to be gathered and reviewed. Therefore, the objective of this paper was to conduct a scoping review of the literature reporting on the neurophysiological and behavioral correlates of patients in the sub-acute and chronic phase (i.e., >10 days post-injury) following mTBI. METHODS: MEDLINE/Ovid, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane, and PsycINFO were searched for studies from 1994 to November 2020 that investigated the neurophysiological and behavioral correlates in the sub-acute and chronic phase following mTBI. Exclusion criteria included: treatment or intervention studies, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)/Psychological symptoms as primary diagnosis, <19 years old, animals, cells/tissue/histology, currently enrolled in therapy (pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment), and deep brain stimulation. Studies also had to fit within the following inclusion criteria: electronically available, humans, 1994 onward, full text, English, sub-acute, chronic, post concussion syndrome. 336 citations were identified, of which 24 studies were eligible for inclusion in the primary analysis. RESULTS: We are currently analyzing our results and anticipate to have results by the end of the 1st week of April , 2021.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Sambit Mohapatra

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Neuroscience

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Neurophysiological and Behavioral Correlates of Post-Concussion Syndrome: A scoping review and validation of methods

INTRODUCTION: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is caused by an impact or jolt to the head which results in a physiological disruption to the brain. While typically symptoms such as headache, nausea, dizziness and fatigue subside within the first 10 days, a subset of patients fail to recover within this time span and develop prolonged neurophysiological and behavioral symptoms characteristic of post-concussion syndrome (PCS). There is an extensive body of research investigating the various cognitive, physical, emotional, and neurological deficits correlated with PCS. Previous research is yet to depict a complete understanding of the prolonged structural and functional changes that occur within the brain as a result of mTBI. While there are numerous studies assessing the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of PCS, with my knowledge, there remains a need for these papers to be gathered and reviewed. Therefore, the objective of this paper was to conduct a scoping review of the literature reporting on the neurophysiological and behavioral correlates of patients in the sub-acute and chronic phase (i.e., >10 days post-injury) following mTBI. METHODS: MEDLINE/Ovid, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane, and PsycINFO were searched for studies from 1994 to November 2020 that investigated the neurophysiological and behavioral correlates in the sub-acute and chronic phase following mTBI. Exclusion criteria included: treatment or intervention studies, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)/Psychological symptoms as primary diagnosis, <19 years>old, animals, cells/tissue/histology, currently enrolled in therapy (pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment), and deep brain stimulation. Studies also had to fit within the following inclusion criteria: electronically available, humans, 1994 onward, full text, English, sub-acute, chronic, post concussion syndrome. 336 citations were identified, of which 24 studies were eligible for inclusion in the primary analysis. RESULTS: We are currently analyzing our results and anticipate to have results by the end of the 1st week of April , 2021.