Presentation Title

Clouded Cause: Inclusive Research into the Impacts of Sociocultural Environment and Stress on College Students’ Smoking Patterns

Project Collaborators

Michael Hill Jr. (Graduate Student Mentor, Center of Health and Wellbeing)

Abstract

To inform the creation of broadly accessible and effective anti-smoking programs on an increasingly diverse campus, this research employs an inclusive approach to studying smoking/vaping techniques and behaviors at the University of Vermont. Targeted interviews were designed to catalog the proliferation of methods and substances that students smoke/vape on campus and the linguistic diversity used in their nomenclature about these practices. This project investigates various student perceptions of what influences their smoking behaviors, such as stress, campus cultural norms, social environment, and perception of risk, and their evaluation and awareness of the university’s current smoking initiatives. Psychological stress, particularly in relation to the pandemic and academics, was often noted as a factor likely to increase the desire to smoke, most notably nicotine or tobacco products. Students were less likely to increase their marijuana consumption in relation to stress. Social environment was highly connected to the availability of products, the initiation of smoking, and the ability to harm reduce or cease the use of nicotine, tobacco, and marijuana products.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Deborah Blom

Secondary Mentor NetID

jlshea

Secondary Mentor Name

Jeanne Shea

Graduate Student Mentors

Michael Hill Jr.

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Anthropology

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

Secondary Research Category

Arts & Humanities

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Clouded Cause: Inclusive Research into the Impacts of Sociocultural Environment and Stress on College Students’ Smoking Patterns

To inform the creation of broadly accessible and effective anti-smoking programs on an increasingly diverse campus, this research employs an inclusive approach to studying smoking/vaping techniques and behaviors at the University of Vermont. Targeted interviews were designed to catalog the proliferation of methods and substances that students smoke/vape on campus and the linguistic diversity used in their nomenclature about these practices. This project investigates various student perceptions of what influences their smoking behaviors, such as stress, campus cultural norms, social environment, and perception of risk, and their evaluation and awareness of the university’s current smoking initiatives. Psychological stress, particularly in relation to the pandemic and academics, was often noted as a factor likely to increase the desire to smoke, most notably nicotine or tobacco products. Students were less likely to increase their marijuana consumption in relation to stress. Social environment was highly connected to the availability of products, the initiation of smoking, and the ability to harm reduce or cease the use of nicotine, tobacco, and marijuana products.