Investigating immune-stroma signaling landscape in the developing meninges

Abstract

Recent research has revealed that populations of immune cells outside of the brain parenchyma influence the brain itself. These immune cells are located in border tissues such as the meninges. The meninges host a rich and dynamic immune environment, housing innate myeloid cells and T cells. This protective tissue is also home to diverse groups of stromal cells which likely provide a niche that supports immune function in the meninges. Here, we investigate the cross-talk between immune and stromal cell populations through development and into aging in the mouse, and how known signaling pathways are altered throughout aging.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Julie.Dragon@uvm.edu

Secondary Mentor Name

Beth Stevens

Graduate Student Mentors

Alec Walker

Faculty/Staff Collaborators

Vahid Gazestani

Student Collaborators

Theodore Fisher

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Molecular Genetics

Second Program/Major

Microbiology

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Abstract only.

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Investigating immune-stroma signaling landscape in the developing meninges

Recent research has revealed that populations of immune cells outside of the brain parenchyma influence the brain itself. These immune cells are located in border tissues such as the meninges. The meninges host a rich and dynamic immune environment, housing innate myeloid cells and T cells. This protective tissue is also home to diverse groups of stromal cells which likely provide a niche that supports immune function in the meninges. Here, we investigate the cross-talk between immune and stromal cell populations through development and into aging in the mouse, and how known signaling pathways are altered throughout aging.